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How (and why) to archive a Confluence page
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How (and why) to archive a Confluence page

A headshot of Simon Kirrane
Simon Kirrane
10th April, 2024
A Confluence web page being filed in a large cabinet on a stylised background
A headshot of Simon Kirrane
Simon Kirrane
10th April, 2024
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What does archiving a page do?
Why archive a Confluence page?
Can everyone archive pages in Confluence?
How to archive a Confluence page

Learn what happens when you archive a Confluence page, why you should do it, and most importantly - how you can.

You’ve got a Confluence page that’s no longer needed, but you might want the information again in future. What do you do? You archive it!

Here’s our easy guide to archiving Confluence pages in just three steps. For a more permanent solution, read our guide on how to delete Confluence pages.


What does archiving a page do?

When you archive a Confluence page, you move it out of your page tree and into the archive. This means that you (and others) can no longer edit, comment on, or like the page. However, if there comes a time when you need to use the page again, you can restore it back into your page tree where it’ll work exactly the same as it did previously.

You can still link to a page even if it’s in the archive.

Why archive a Confluence page?

  • Unclutter your page trees: Make your spaces easier to navigate by removing pages that are no longer needed (at least for now) from your page trees.

  • Clean up your Quick Search: Archiving a page removes it from your Quick Search results - filtering out what you don’t need and keeping the 'quick' in the search.

  • Keep information relevant: Have out-of-date pages? Prevent confusion for team members and customers alike by archiving pages with irrelevant information.

Can everyone archive pages in Confluence?

Unfortunately, no. Users on the free plan will see the following pop-up when they go to archive a page:
A pop-up shown in Confluence that appears if you try to archive a page while on the free plan
As you can see, though, it is possible to use the archive feature if you sign up to a free trial for the Standard plan.

You also can’t archive pages that aren’t owned by you, unless you are an admin of the space that the page belongs to. If you’re unable to archive a page, the archive option will be greyed out.
The archive option greyed out in a dropdown menu in Confluence

How to archive a Confluence page

From the page itself:

1. Click More actions (the three dots) in the upper right corner of your page.
2. Select Archive from the list of actions.
The More actions dropdown menu from a Confluence page
3. You’ll get a pop-up giving you the opportunity to add a note about your page before archiving it.
A pop-up for users to archive their Confluence page. There is a box for an optional note
4. Click the Archive button to put your Confluence page safely in the digital archive.
A screenshot of the message that appears in Confluence after archiving a page. It reads 'Archived successfully'
From the page’s space:

1. Navigate to the space that the page belongs to.
2. In the left sidebar, click the three dots beside the name of the page you’d like to archive.
A user selecting the three dots next to a page in the Confluence space sidebar. A dropdown menu is shown
3. Select Archive from the dropdown menu.
4. As with the first method of archiving your Confluence page, you can now choose to add an optional note, and archive the page.


Now that you know how to archive a Confluence page, you can ensure that only the information you need is at your fingertips. And it’s safely stored for whenever you might need it in the future.

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Written by
A headshot of Simon Kirrane
Simon Kirrane
Senior Content Marketing Manager
With a 20-year career in content marketing, Simon has represented a range of international brands. His current specialism is the future of work and work management. Simon is skilled at launching content pipelines, establishing powerful brands, and crafting innovative content strategies.

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